Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

OnePlus 3T vs OnePlus 5: Only incremental goodness

The fact that the OnePlus 3T is an impressive handset needs no reiteration. So, instead of focusing on the already-celebrated merits of the 3T, I wrote an Amazon review mainly addressing the question that has been bothering OnePlus 3T users of late: whether an upgrade to the “5” is justifiable.

I bought the OnePlus 3T a month ago, knowing fully well that the launch of the OnePlus 5 was just around the corner. Even then, ever since OnePlus released the “5”, I have been tempted to upgrade. Still, nothing short of a shut-up-and-take-my-money value proposition could have convinced me to shell out ₹38K more of my hard-earned money on this shiny new toy.

While the OnePlus 5 specs are undeniably unmatched, a couple of visits to the OnePlus Experience Zone in Noida convinced me that the overall package is only an incremental improvement over the 3T. In many cases, the difference isn’t discernible even on close scrutiny. On the looks front, the OnePlus 5 seems to have taken a step back with only two drab colors available.

While the jury is still out, I did observe the rear dual-camera on the 5 click some excellent portraits with nicely-defined bokeh. However, OnePlus’ algorithm seems to fail to recognize more than one human subject, bringing only the closest one into focus. There is no front dual-camera anyway, so selfies, which is how most portrait photos happen these days, won’t have the depth effect. In fact, I compared the front cameras of the 5 and the 3T side-by-side and could observe no appreciable difference.

The shape and color of the 5 was the real deal-breaker for me. Depending on the version of the 5 that you choose—6 GB/64 GB or 8 GB/128 GB—you have only one of the two colors available. The two “grayish” colors, on their own, are not sufficiently differentiated.

I have no direct data about the battery life of the 5 available, but the 3T works like a charm on that front too. Even upon very active use—9 to 12 hours of screen uptime—the 3T’s battery lasts me more than a full day (24 hours). Efficient in every sense of the word!

Upon great deliberation, then, I have decided to stick to the 3T and give the 5 a miss, at least for now. Maybe, I’ll wait and watch if the 5T is in the works. Alternatively, if the 5 becomes available in some tempting colors (think red!), I might just reconsider my stand. Even then, the lack of an impressive value proposition for upgrade may just tilt the scales to the detriment of the 5 once again.

MY VERDICT: NO. There are no pressing reasons for OnePlus 3T users to upgrade to the OnePlus 5.

Self-censoring Facebook at work

If you feel Facebook is a tempting distraction at work, you’re not alone. Plus, most companies now track how much time their employees are spending on social networks. Hogwash? – check out the Time Doctor website to understand the sort of statistics you may be generating in the course of “harmless” Web browsing.

An easy solution to curtail your Facebook usage at work is to block the website at a “local” level on your computer’s operating system. Doing so is easy. Just follow the steps below for your OS.

Windows

  1. Navigate to C:\Windows and right-click notepad.exe. Select Run as administrator. When prompted, click Yes to allow Notepad to make changes to your computer.
  2. In Notepad, open the hosts file for editing. The file is usually located in the C:\Windows\System 32\drivers\etc folder on your computer.
  3. Add the following lines to the file:

    127.0.0.1 https://facebook.com
    127.0.0.1 login.facebook.com
    127.0.0.1 http://www.facebook.com
    127.0.0.1 blog.facebook.com
    127.0.0.1 apps.facebook.com

  4. Save hosts.
  5. Repeat steps 1-4 for all your work computers.
  6. Try opening Facebook.com on each computer. You’ll be redirected to 127.0.0.1 instead.

Mac OS X

  1. Open the Terminal.
  2. At the command prompt, run this command: sudo nano /etc/hosts.
  3. In Nano, add the following lines at the end of the hosts file:

    127.0.0.1 https://facebook.com
    127.0.0.1 login.facebook.com
    127.0.0.1 http://www.facebook.com
    127.0.0.1 blog.facebook.com
    127.0.0.1 apps.facebook.com

  4. Press Control+X to save the hosts file. When prompted, type Y to confirm writing changes to the disk.
  5. Repeat steps 1-4 for all your work computers.
  6. Try opening Facebook.com on each computer. You’ll be redirected to 127.0.0.1 instead.

That’s all. I first came across this useful method on the Hide Tools blog.

PS: I still remain a die-hard Facebook user, but at home. 🙂